We use cookies on this website. See how you can control your settings.

About us | Sitemap | Links | Accessibility | Copyright | Contact us | News | Video | Kidneypedia | Kidney disease | Kidney treatment | Patient lifestyle | Research |
Treatment Options

For most people with mild CKD (stages 1-3) treatment will consist of adopting a healthy lifestyle and taking some medications to control their blood pressure and prevent their kidneys from getting worse.

If your CKD progresses to stage 4-5 you will need to start thinking about the treatment options available for kidney failure.

Read our guide to living with early stage chronic kidney disease (PDF 4Mb)

Choosing the treatment option that's right for you

Self-care haemodialysis


You will be taught how to carry out your own dialysis.

Many kidney units at hospitals in the United Kingdom encourage people to participate in their own treatment at their haemodialysis unit. This is called self-care.

What is self-care haemodialysis?
Self-care dialysis is where you are taught how to carry out some or all of your own dialysis treatment in a dialysis unit. It can also involve learning more about living with kidney disease and staying healthy.

Why it might be right for you

  • You will have more control over your treatment and greater independence.
  • You can save yourself time - if you do self-care dialysis you don´t need to wait for nursing assistance.
  • Self-care can offer you more flexibility about when and where you dialyse. This might allow you to return to work or have more leisure time.
  • If you self-care you can consider one of the home dialysis choices which may suit your lifestyle better.
  • Learning to self-care on dialysis often leads to a greater understanding and management of CKD. This can benefit you in the long-term and ultimately improve your quality of life.

Why it might not be right for you

  • At first you might not feel ready to do your own dialysis. Sometimes people start learning once they have been dialysing for a while.
  • You might not be fit or well enough to consider self-care dialysis.